Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

a relationship in language, politics, and memory by David W. Blight

Publisher: Marquette University Press in Milwaukee

Written in English
Cover of: Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln | David W. Blight
Published: Pages: 24 Downloads: 642
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Places:

  • United States,
  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895 -- Influence.,
  • Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 -- Influence.,
  • Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895 -- Oratory.,
  • Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 -- Oratory.,
  • Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 -- Relations with African Americans.,
  • Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States.,
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- African Americans.,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865.,
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Influence.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 21-24).

StatementDavid W. Blight.
SeriesFrank L. Klement lectures ;, no. 10
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE449.D75 B47 2001
The Physical Object
Pagination24 p. ;
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3939200M
ISBN 100874623340
LC Control Number2001005745

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass never faced each other on a public stage, as Lincoln famously did with Illinois' Democratic Sen. Stephen A. Douglas in what history terms the Lincoln-Douglas Debates. Still, Frederick Douglass did engage the first Republican president in debates. Frederick Douglass spoke, wrote, and buttonholed leading. A revealing historical and photographic tour of the homes of influential Civil War figures, including Robert E. Lee, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, Stonewall Jackson, and others. Timed to coincide with the th anniversary of the Civil War and a fitting sequel. While the Civil War raged, the two titans—Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln—formed an unlikely friendship that changed the nation’s course. Each man needed the other to forward his own agenda: Douglass needed Lincoln to end slavery, and Lincoln needed Douglass to mobilize blacks and destroy the Confederacy. “Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln were essential to that process, and so too were thousands of enslaved men and women who fled Southern plantations during the Civil War, seeking refuge from slavery behind Union lines and aiding the Union war effort, and thousands of Union soldiers, white and black, who became an army of liberation.

Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey; c. February – Febru ) was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, becoming famous for his oratory and incisive antislavery tion: Abolitionist, suffragist, author, editor, diplomat. Historians Harold Holzer, Edna Greene Medford and David Blight talked about the views of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass on emancipating those held in slavery. They tracked their evolution.   Lincoln was born on Febru , and Douglass on Febru (although Douglass acknowledged in his autobiography, Narrative_of_the_Life_of_Frederick_Douglass,_an_American_Slave. Douglass and Lincoln were the preeminent self-made men of their time. In this masterful dual biography, the first to view the two great leaders as self-made men, Stauffer describes the transformations in the lives of these giants during a major shift in cultural history, when men rejected the status quo and embraced new ideals of personal liberty.

Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln by David W. Blight Download PDF EPUB FB2

From the author of Lincoln: A Photobiography, comes a clear-sighted, carefully researched account of two surprisingly parallel lives and how they intersected at a critical moment in Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln book.

history. Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were both self-taught, both great readers and believers in the importance of literacy, both men born poor who by their own efforts reached positions of power and /5(61). Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln were the preeminent self-made men of their time.

In this masterful dual biography, award-winning Harvard University scholar John Stauffer describes the transformations in the lives of these two giants during a major shift in cultural history, when men rejected the status quo and embraced new ideals of personal liberty/5(58).

Discover Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln: A Relationship in Language, Politics, and Memory (The Frank L. Klement Lecture Series #10) by David W.

Blight and millions of other books available at Barnes & Noble. Shop paperbacks, eBooks, and more!Pages:   Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass is a nonfiction book by Russell Freedman/5(). Online shopping from a great selection at Books Store. The Book that Taught Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln How To Speak In anda year-old Maryland slave and a year-old backwoods store clerk picked up the same book – the Columbian Orator.

Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln were the preeminent self-made men of their time. In this masterful dual biography, award-winning HarvardUniversity scholar John Stauffer describes the transformations in the lives of these two giants during a major shift in cultural history, when men rejected the status quo and embraced new ideals of personal liberty.4/5.

Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln: A Relationship in Language, Politics, and Memory (Frank L. Klement Lectures) Paperback – October 1, by David W.

Blight (Author) › Visit Amazon's David W. Blight Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search 3/5(1). Frederick Douglass, “Eulogy for Abraham Lincoln” Frederick Douglass (–) From President Lincoln Assassinated!.

The Firsthand Story of the Murder, Manhunt, Trial, and Mourning. Lincoln funeral procession at the corner of Broadway and Union Square in New York City, Ap Photograph by Robert N.

Dennis. Frederick Douglass to Mary Todd Lincoln, Aug (The Gilder Lehrman Collection, GLC). Douglass—as Lincoln’s friend, critic, and adviser—perhaps best summarized his thoughts about the president during a speech ingiven during the unveiling of the Freedman’s Monument in the nation’s capital.

The Politician And The Reformer Abraham Lincoln ( ) and Frederick Douglass ( -- )are American heroes with each exemplifying a unique aspect of the American spirit/5(30). Quote by Frederick Douglass: “Abraham Lincoln was not, in the fullest sense o ” “Abraham Lincoln was not, in the fullest sense of the word, either our man or our model.

In his interests, in his associations, in his habits of thought, and in his prejudices, he was a white man. Stauffer's parallel lives theme is a good one, but anyone who wants to read a book devoted to it should read James Oakes's The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics().

Stauffer tells the essential Lincoln-Douglass stories but they die in. Freedman revisits the subject of his Newbery-winning Lincoln: A Photobiography (), but this time the 16th president shares billing with 4/5(4). Abraham Lincoln’s advisers warned him not to welcome strangers during wartime but he persisted.

He called these meetings “taking a public opinion bath.” On the sweltering morning of Aug one of Lincoln’s uninvited visitors was Frederick Douglass, a tall, burly black man dressed in a dark suit and a high-collared white shirt.

- Buy Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln book online at best prices in India on Read Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln book reviews & author details and more at Free delivery on qualified s: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass both encountered many tough challenges and did whatever they could to help the country; which makes them heroic.

Different from Lincoln and Douglass, the antagonist from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets gives several examples of what a hero should never do on any account.

Lincoln, born in to poor farmers in Kentucky, moved to Illinois, earned a law degree and was elected to state and national-level office. Douglass was born into slavery in Maryland.

After Douglass’s escape, he became an ardent abolitionist, publishing his autobiography and a weekly abolitionist newspaper entitled The North Star.

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass met only three times, but their friendship changed a nation. Lincoln was white and president of the United States; Douglass was black and a former slave.

Yet they were kindred spirits: Both had risen from poverty to prominence, both were self-educated men and both had a book in common, Caleb Bingham's The. As fate would have it, a young Abraham Lincoln was reading the Columbian Orator around the same time as Frederick Douglass. The two would famously meet on three different occasions during the Civil War.

For both, that treasured book would express the principles they carried with them throughout their lives. Frederick Douglass arrived at the White House on a hot day in August without an appointment.

He was a black man on a mission at a time when the country was torn by Civil War. 20 David W. Blight, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln: A Relationship in Language, Politics, and Memory, Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Marquette University Press,p.

10 21 Abraham Lincoln, "The Address of the Hon. Abraham Lincoln in the Indication of the Policy of the Framers of the Constitution and the Principles of the Republican Party.".

The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics James Oakes W. Norton & Company, - History - pages4/5(4).

Other Books by Frederick Douglass. InDouglass conferred with President Abraham Lincoln regarding the treatment of Black soldiers, and later with President. The name of the book is "Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln." And Author John Stauffer joins us now.

He. Douglass returned with funds to purchase his freedom and also to start his own antislavery newspaper, the North Star (later Frederick Douglass’s Paper), which he published from to in Rochester, New abolition leader William Lloyd Garrison disagreed with the need for a separate Black-oriented press, and the two men broke over this issue as well as over Douglass’s support.

Drawing on previously untapped sources, Young Frederick Douglass recreates with fidelity and in convincing detail the background and early life of the man who was to become “the gadfly of America’s conscience” and the undisputed spokesman for nineteenth-century black a new foreword by renowned Douglass scholar David W.

Blight, Dickson J. Preston’s highly regarded 5/5(1). • “Reminiscences of Abraham Lincoln,” Frederick Douglass • “Lincoln’s Assassination,” Elizabeth Keckly • “Artemus Ward on His Visit to Abe Lincoln,” Artemus Ward Buy the book President Lincoln Assassinated!.

The Firsthand Story of the Murder, Manhunt, Trial, and Mourning Clothbound • pages List price: $ Black abolitionist leader and former slave Frederick Douglass believed that African Americans could achieve freedom and full citizenship only by participating in the war.

Because Lincoln’s first concern was preserving the Union, he did not publicly support the recruitment of black soldiers until after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, Douglass signs: “Very truly yours / Frederick Douglass / ” This unusually large, clear, and dark signature, was certainly given for display.

inDouglass purchased Cedar Hill in Anascotia, Washington, D.C. Intended as a summer retreat, today the home is the site of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. Frederick Douglass () was an antislavery lecturer, a journalist, a publisher, and the bestselling author of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, followed by My Bondage and My Freedom, and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.

John Stauffer (editor) is a professor of literature and African American studies and chair of the History of American Civilization 5/5(2).Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass didn't even meet until less than two years before Lincoln's untimely death.

On AugDouglass dared to enter the White House and request an audience with the president. Although the Emancipation Proclamation had been issued earlier this year and blacks were at least theoretically free, there was Reviews: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were both self-taught, both great readers and believers in the importance of literacy, both men born poor who by their own efforts reached positions of power and prominence--Lincoln as president of the United States and Douglass as the most famous and influential African American of his ss, an Author: Russell Freedman.